NEGROPHOBIA: Episode One

Sociology Professor Ginetta Candelario systematically breaks down the roots of negrophobia within the history of the Western Hemisphere.

music in episode: Les rêves sont des poussière du possible, written, composed & performed by Muhr

Ginetta Candelario is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latin American & Latina/o Studies and as well as a faculty affiliate of the Study of Women and Gender Program, of the Community Engagement and Social Change Concentration, and the Advisory Group for the Steinem & Mankiller School for Organizers at Smith College. She has directed the LALS Program several times, most recently from 2011 to 2014, and is the newly elected Vice President of the National Latin@ Studies Association. Her research interests include Dominican communities and identity formations, race and ethnicity in the Americas, beauty culture, Latina/o communities and identity formations, museum studies, Latin American and Latina feminisms.

Her first book, Black Behind the Ears: Dominican Identity From Museums to Beauty Shops was published by Duke University Press in 2007 and received the 2009 Best Book Award from the Latino Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association and the 2008 Best Book Award from the New England Council of Latin American Studies. Her edited volume, Miradas desencadenantes: Los estudios de género en la República Dominicana al inicio del tercer milenio, a collection of recent gender and women's studies research in the Dominican Republic, was published in April of 2005. Her current research is on Dominican feminist thought and activism, 1880-1961, which she is developing into a book length study, tentatively titled Voices Echoing Beyond the Seas: Dominican Feminisms, 1882-1942

She has been teaching community-based learning and research courses on "The Sociology of Hispanic Caribbean Communities in the U.S" in collaboration with a dozen Holyoke community based organizations and non-profits for more than a decade, for which she has received various awards. She has received fellowships from the Fulbright Scholars Program, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, the City University of New York Graduate Center, Smith College Mellon Fellowships, Five Colleges, Inc., and the Rappaport Foundation. In addition, she is on the editorial boards of various journals including: Meridians: Race, Feminism, Transnationalism and Latin American and Caribbean Ethnicities.


THE ARTISTS: Episode Two

Playwright Douglas Turner Ward and illustrator George Ford discuss what it was like being artists of color before and during the Civil Rights era.

music in Episode: Day One, Parents Dance - Part One, written, composed & performed by Paul Rucker (cello) Hans Teuber (saxophone)

Douglas Turner Ward, an actor, director and playwright is considered a living legend in the world of African American theatre. Although he has achieved much during his lifetime, his co-founding of the Negro Ensemble Company (NEC) in 1968, ranks as his greatest achievement. NEC spawned over 200 productions within a 35 year period. It has been the incubator of opportunity for such talents as Denzel Washington, Phylicia Rashad, Samuel L. Jackson, Angela Bassett, Giancarlo Esposito, Laurence Fishburne, Esther Rolle, Cleavon Little, Frances Foster, Sherman Helmsley, David Alan Grier, and Lynn Whitfield. NEC was the flagship theatre for the torrid black arts movement of the halcyon 1960s civil rights movement.  

Ward was born in Burnside, Louisiana on May 5, 1930, the son of Roosevelt and Dorothy (Short) Ward. In 1955 he began studying acting with Paul Mann at the Actor’s Workshop in New York, and by 1956 he debuted in Eugene O’Neill’s play, The Iceman Cometh. Later he understudied Sidney Poitier in Lorraine Hansberry’s 1959 Broadway production of A Raisin in the Sun.  Around this time Ward began writing plays. His first two efforts, Day of Absence and Happy Ending were very successful off Broadway.  In founding NEC, Ward included a training component along with a 15 member acting company. Ward continued to lead the company for many years but he finally relinquished the artistic directorship of NEC in the late 1990s and is now retired. 

George Ford is the illustrator of over thirty books for children including Jamal's Busy Day, Bright Eyes, Brown Skin; Afro-Bets First Book About Africa and Baby Jesus, Like My Brother. The first winner of the Coretta Scott King Award for illustration, for the book, Ray Charles, George Ford also illustrated The Story of Ruby Bridges by Robert Coles. Mr. Ford lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Making his film debut in this 1971 film , Bill Cosby stars in this racially charged western set 1870s southwest. As a Union Army Civil War veteran turned farmer, he settles on his 14 acres of land earned as a soldier. Douglas Turner Ward co-stars. 


SPECULATIVE BLACKNESS: Episode Three

Author and scholar andré carrington discusses the highly racialized genre of speculative fiction, which includes science fiction, fantasy, and utopian works. He talks about his book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction.

music in episode: OilSomber Time written, composed and performed by Paul Rucker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROYAL BLOOD: Episode Four

Painter Nargus Harounzadeh tells us why she only paints women, and how studying psychiatry has deepened her understanding of women.

music in episode: Fragments A (steady)Fragments B (adrift)Fragment C (beautiful) written, composed and performed by Muhr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LADY FANCY NAILS : Episode Five

Nail Artist Eda Midori discusses nail art as radical self-care; and the last bastion of women's beauty that remains outside of the influence of the male gaze.

music in episode: The DeadSome kids might written, composed & performed by Muhr

photos: Eda Midori, New York Called, Liz Barclay, Serichai Traipoom, Nail It Magazine, Kristin Wolford.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE STAR SIDE OF BIRD HILL: Episode Six

Writer Naomi Jackson discusses her first novel, The Star Side of Bird Hill, growing up in and writing about Caribbean Brooklyn and reverse migration, and her forays into teaching the craft.

music in episode: Willow WaltzMyth Part IITurnaround & P.S. I Remember written, composed & performed by Gretchen Yanover.

 

 

 

 

CIRCLE KEEPER: Episode Seven

Healer/Educator Elizabeth Miu-Lan Young discusses self-healing and Restorative Practice.

 

 

Music in episode: Mint EP written, composed & performed by Dark SunnLuanda, written, composed & performed by preochines. Geisha Girl, written, composed & performed by Simon Wolfe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTERFERENCE ARCHIVE: Episode Eight

The mission of the Interference Archive is to explore the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in an open stacks archival collection, publications, a study center, and public programs including as exhibitions, workshops, talks, and screenings, all of which encourage critical and creative engagement with the rich history of social movements.

Music in episode: written, composed & performed by Deebs.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

andré carrington is Assistant Professor of English at Drexel University. His research explores the politics of race, gender, and genre in Black and American cultural production. His first book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction (University of Minnesota Press, 2016), interrogates the racialized interior discourse of the fantastic genres in 20th century print and visual culture. In 2015, he co-organized the first international Queers & Comics conference. He has published articles in Present Tense, Sounding Out!, and African & Black Diaspora and chapters in the Blackwell Companion to the Harlem Renaissance, The Blacker the Ink: Constructions of Blackness in Comics & Sequential Art, and Black Gay Genius: Answering Joseph Beam’s Call. His current project, Audiofuturism, is a historical and theoretical examination of the racial popular imaginary in science fiction radio plays and their literary antecedents. In 2016-17, he is convening colloquia on sound studies and Afrofuturism at Drexel University and at Northwestern University.

Fandom fallout of Hunger Games casting.

Miles Morales, the new (black latino) Spiderman

Research for Speculative Blackness comes from Eaton Science Fiction Collection at University of California-Riverside and Internet Science Fiction Database.

carrington's intellectual influences are: his late mentor José Esteban Muñoz, the works of Pierre Bourdieu, Michelle Wright, Stuart Hall and Paul Gilroy, and Samuel Delany.

Follow him online at www.twitter.com/prof_carrington and www.andrecarringtonphd.com


photo Erin Red

photo Erin Red

NARGUS is a New York City-based independent Iranian artist. She has curated and produced numerous shows in the NYC area. In 2011, Nargus held her first solo exhibition, Hearts Aroar, selling half the collection. In describing her work, she says, "I paint women to give color to their multitudes, their histories. The women whom I paint are bold, loud, and poised in the face of the societal impulse to define us--to, in some cases, silence us." In addition to developing her art, Nargus is pursuing her Doctorate (DNP Psychiatry) at Columbia University; she also works as a Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner, and a Yoga Therapist. Her examination of the human condition informs and gives shape to her work as an artist, while her work as an artist grounds and readies her for her work in psychiatry. Nargus holds BAs from the University of Pennsylvania in Philosophy, Politics, Economics (PPE), and English.

Huffington Post

New York Magazine

Bellus Magazine

Nargus's work can be seen at her website.

 


 photo: Malik Isasis   Eda Midori is the founder of  Lady Fancy Nails . Her philosophy as an artist centers on the notion that nail art externalizes the unique, inherent strength and vibrancy that exists within women. Eda often creates pronounced architectural and linear inspired nail art to reflect women’s power. It is critical that her design aesthetic represents Eda’s ethos and perspective as a creative, therefore manifesting through her nail art.   Eda has worked with the   top companies in the fashion, beauty, media and art industr      

 photo: Malik Isasis

Eda Midori is the founder of Lady Fancy Nails. Her philosophy as an artist centers on the notion that nail art externalizes the unique, inherent strength and vibrancy that exists within women. Eda often creates pronounced architectural and linear inspired nail art to reflect women’s power. It is critical that her design aesthetic represents Eda’s ethos and perspective as a creative, therefore manifesting through her nail art. Eda has worked with the top companies in the fashion, beauty, media and art industr

  


photo: Lina Cherfas   Naomi Jackson is the author of    The Star Side of Bird Hill   , published by Penguin Press in June 2015. The novel w  as nominated for an NAACP Image Award and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and long-listed for the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize, the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, and the     International Dublin Literary Award, among other accolades.     Naomi studied fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She traveled to South Africa on a Fulbright scholarship, where she received an M.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Cape Town. She is a graduate of Williams College. Naomi's work has appeared in literary journals and magazines in the United States and abroad. She is the recipient of residencies and fellowships from Bread Loaf, MacDowell Colony, the University of Pennsylvania’s    Kelly Writers House   ,    Hedgebrook   , and the    Camargo    Foundation.    Naomi has taught at the University of Iowa, University of Pennsylvania, City College of New York, and Oberlin College. She is currently the Visiting Writer at Amherst College. Jackson     was born and raised in Brooklyn by West Indian parents.     

photo: Lina Cherfas

Naomi Jackson is the author of The Star Side of Bird Hill, published by Penguin Press in June 2015. The novel was nominated for an NAACP Image Award and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and long-listed for the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Prize, the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize, and the International Dublin Literary Award, among other accolades. 

Naomi studied fiction at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She traveled to South Africa on a Fulbright scholarship, where she received an M.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Cape Town. She is a graduate of Williams College. Naomi's work has appeared in literary journals and magazines in the United States and abroad. She is the recipient of residencies and fellowships from Bread Loaf, MacDowell Colony, the University of Pennsylvania’s Kelly Writers House, Hedgebrook, and the Camargo Foundation.

Naomi has taught at the University of Iowa, University of Pennsylvania, City College of New York, and Oberlin College. She is currently the Visiting Writer at Amherst College. Jackson was born and raised in Brooklyn by West Indian parents. 

 


photo: Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

photo: Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

Elizabeth Miu-Lan Young co-founded InterChange Consultants in 1987.  She is a specialist in cultural competencies training focusing on Asian issues at work.   She has been active in the New York City Asian Community for the past 40 years.  One of the founders of the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center in NYC (formerly the Chinatown Health Clinic), she also taught the pilot Asian American Experience course at Hunter College and the University of Southern California.  Liz served as the first Director of Project Reach - a Chinese-American Planning Council program working with Chinatown street gangs.  She also worked in a garment sweatshop to better understand the immigrant experience.  She was a senior research associate with an Affirmative Action consulting firm headed by Dr. Kenneth Clark.

Liz has presented “Political Savvy” and “How to Promote Yourself” seminars for affinity groups of color at Verizon and Lucent Technologies.  She has co-facilitated leadership courses in Hong Kong and Jakarta.  Since 2002, she has provided cross-cultural team building and civil-capacity building in East Timor.

She has also trained administrators, faculty and students in cultural competencies at Fashion Institute of Technology’s Small Business Center, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, New York University, Princeton, the University of Connecticut, Brown University, new graduate students at the Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs and new medical/dental students at Stony Brook University School of Medicine.
 
For the NCAA, Liz has co-facilitated the weeklong Leadership Intensive for the Leadership Institute for Ethnic Minorities and Division III’s groundbreaking Ethnic Minority and Women’s Internship Program joint orientation for interns, their supervisors, and mentors.  She also serves as a staff developer with the Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility, training and coaching public educators to bring Restorative Circles to their students.

Before InterChange, Liz served as an internal consultant on Eastern Airlines’ original Support Team which implemented a company-wide Employee Involvement/Participative Management initiative.

She is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and has received extensive training in Organizational Development.

New York Times

Terms:

DOE - Department of Education


Interference Archive was founded in 2011 by Kevin Caplicki, Molly Fair, Dara Greenwald, and Josh MacPhee. The initial collection grew out of the personal accumulation of Dara and Josh, who amassed an extensive collection of materials including books, prints, music, moving images, and ephemera through their involvement in social movements, DIY and punk, and political art projects over the past 25 years. Since 2011, Interference Archive has launched 16 exhibitions and held more than 100 public events.

• An open-access, open-stack archive of cultural ephemera produced by and for social movements worldwide

• Over 16 exhibitions, including the Persistence of Dreams, a retrospective of work by Sublevarte Collectivo from Mexico City; Radioactivity! Anti-nuclear Movements from Three Mile Island to Fukushima, co-curated with Todos Somos Japon;  Àvenir (“Future”), an installation by the Montreal-based design collective Ècole de la Montagne Rouge, active in the Quebec student strike of 2012; Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York, curated by Ryan Wong; and Self-Determination Inside/Out: Prison Movements Transforming Society.

• Comprehensive exhibition publications: catalogs/timelines/maps for RadioActivity!, Serve the People, The Persistence of Dreams, and Self-Determination Inside/Out, Documents from the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, and We Won’t Move: Tenants Organize in New York City.

• Over 100 talks and workshops, including the history of anti-war posters and graphics by archivist Carol Wells; a May Day poster critique and design charrette with Occuprint; a look at a punk- and anarchist-inspired UK football club by Bristol Radical History Group’s Roger Wilson; a presentation by Egyptian designer and activist Ganzeer; and dozens of programs related to our exhibitions.

• Film screenings in conjunction with our exhibits as well as movies such as Maggots and Men, Land of Destiny, and the premiere of The Days of the Commune.

• A number of significant donations to the collection, including over 300 political protest buttons from Eleanor Bader, hundreds of posters from African and Latin American movements and solidarity organizations from Alexis De Veaux, twenty years worth of anarchist posters from the Bound Together Bookstore in San Francisco, ephemera from European squatters movements from Alan W. Moore, a large selection of anti-nuclear and peace posters from John Miller, and a beautiful collection of Cuban posters from Jesse Maceo Vega-Frey which were originally collected by his father Carlos Vega.